Plastics Recycling FAQ’s

What is Polyethylene?

With an annual consumption of 80 million tonnes, polyethylene is the most widely used plastic in the world. It is typically used for films, sheet, bottles, containers, and household items.

It is produced in a variety of densities and grades, such as high density (HDPE), medium density (MDPE), low density (LDPE), and linear low density (LLDPE). Most grades have excellent chemical resistance, meaning that the plastic is not adversely affected by strong acids or strong bases and is resistant to gentle oxidants and reducing agents.

 

What is Polypropylene?

With an annual consumption of 60 million tonnes, polypropylene (PP) is the second most widely used plastic in the world after polyethylene. It can be produced in a variety of forms giving rise to its use in many different applications including packaging and labelling, plastic parts and reusable containers of various types, laboratory equipment, automotive components, and medical devices. It is mechanically rugged and resistant to many chemical solvents, bases and acids.

Are polyethylene and polypropylene safe plastics?

Yes. They are inert resins that do not contain Bisphenol A (BPA), phthalate plasticisers, heavy metal additives, or allergens, nor do they emit harmful emissions during their production.

Are Visionscape Environmental SA post-consumer resins (PCR) REACH registered for use in the European Union?

Our PCR are recycled from REACH registered polymers and are therefore exempt from REACH registration and can be used in any European Union country.

Are Visionscape PCR compliant with RoHS and do they contain any Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC)?

Visionscape Environmental SA PCR, to the best of our knowledge, do not contain any of the substances regulated under RoHS and do not contain any SVHC’s as currently listed by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA).

How does PCR production affect the environment?

The production of recycled polyethylene and polypropylene PCR typically emits 78% less greenhouse gases than the production of corresponding prime (virgin) pellet.

What is the difference in energy usage between PCR and virgin pellet production?

The production of recycled polyethylene and polypropylene PCR typically uses 90% less energy than the production of corresponding virgin pellet.